OPEN Foundation

C. Abdallah

Ketamine: A Paradigm Shift for Depression Research and Treatment

Abstract

Ketamine is the first exemplar of a rapid-acting antidepressant with efficacy for treatment-resistant symptoms of mood disorders. Its discovery emerged from a reconceptualization of the biology of depression. Neurobiological insights into ketamine efficacy shed new light on the mechanisms underlying antidepressant efficacy.
Krystal, J. H., Abdallah, C. G., Sanacora, G., Charney, D. S., & Duman, R. S. (2019). Ketamine: A Paradigm Shift for Depression Research and Treatment. Neuron101(5), 774-778., 10.1016/j.neuron.2019.02.005
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Synaptic Loss and the Pathophysiology of PTSD: Implications for Ketamine as a Prototype Novel Therapeutic

Abstract

PURPOSE OF REVIEW:
Studies of the neurobiology and treatment of PTSD have highlighted many aspects of the pathophysiology of this disorder that might be relevant to treatment. The purpose of this review is to highlight the potential clinical importance of an often-neglected consequence of stress models in animals that may be relevant to PTSD: the stress-related loss of synaptic connectivity.
RECENT FINDINGS:
Here, we will briefly review evidence that PTSD might be a “synaptic disconnection syndrome” and highlight the importance of this perspective for the emerging therapeutic application of ketamine as a potential rapid-acting treatment for this disorder that may work, in part, by restoring synaptic connectivity. Synaptic disconnection may contribute to the profile of PTSD symptoms that may be targeted by novel pharmacotherapeutics.
Krystal, J. H., Abdallah, C. G., Averill, L. A., Kelmendi, B., Harpaz-Rotem, I., Sanacora, G., … & Duman, R. S. (2017). Synaptic loss and the pathophysiology of PTSD: implications for ketamine as a prototype novel therapeutic. Current Psychiatry Reports19(10), 74. 10.1007/s11920-017-0829-z
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Posttraumatic Stress Disorder: An Integrated Overview of the Neurobiological Rationale for Pharmacology

Abstract

Thirty years of research on the biology of posttraumatic stress disorder now provides a foundation for hypotheses related to the mechanisms underlying the pharmacotherapy of this disorder. Only two medications, sertraline and paroxetine, are approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of PTSD. Although these medications are somewhat effective, other treatment mechanisms must be explored to address the unmet need for effective treatment. This article provides a concise summary of advances in our understanding of the neurobiology of PTSD and novel approaches to pharmacotherapy.
Kelmendi, B., Adams, T. G., Southwick, S., Abdallah, C. G., & Krystal, J. H. (2017). Posttraumatic stress disorder: An integrated overview of the neurobiological rationale for pharmacology. Clinical Psychology: Science and Practice. 10.1111/cpsp.12202
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Prefrontal Connectivity and Glutamate Transmission: Relevance to Depression Pathophysiology and Ketamine Treatment

Abstract

Background

Prefrontal global brain connectivity with global signal regression (GBCr) was proposed as a robust biomarker of depression and was associated with ketamine’s mechanism of action. Here, we investigated prefrontal GBCr in treatment-resistant depression (TRD) at baseline and following treatment. Then, we conducted a set of pharmacological challenges in healthy subjects to investigate the glutamate neurotransmission correlates of GBCr.

Methods

In the cohort A study, we used functional magnetic resonance imaging to compare GBCr between 22 patients with TRD and 29 healthy control subjects. Then, we examined the effects of ketamine and midazolam on GBCr in patients with TRD 24 hours posttreatment. In the cohort B study, we acquired repeated functional magnetic resonance imaging in 18 healthy subjects to determine the effects of lamotrigine (a glutamate release inhibitor), ketamine, and lamotrigine-by-ketamine interaction.

Results

In the cohort A study, patients with TRD showed significant reduction in dorsomedial and dorsolateral prefrontal GBCr compared with healthy control subjects. In patients with TRD, GBCr in the altered clusters significantly increased 24 hours following ketamine (effect size = 1.0, confidence interval = 0.3 to 1.8) but not following midazolam (effect size = 0.5, confidence interval = −0.6 to 1.3). In the cohort B study, oral lamotrigine reduced GBCr 2 hours postadministration, while ketamine increased medial prefrontal GBCr during infusion. Lamotrigine significantly reduced the ketamine-induced GBCr surge. Exploratory analyses showed elevated ventral prefrontal GBCr in TRD and significant reduction of ventral prefrontal GBCr during ketamine infusion in healthy subjects.

Conclusions

This study provides the first replication of the ability of ketamine to normalize depression-related prefrontal dysconnectivity. It also provides indirect evidence that these effects may be triggered by the capacity of ketamine to enhance glutamate neurotransmission.

Abdallah, C. G., Averill, C. L., Salas, R., Averill, L. A., Baldwin, P. R., Krystal, J. H., … & Mathalon, D. H. (2017). Prefrontal Connectivity & Glutamate Transmission: Relevance to Depression Pathophysiology and Ketamine Treatment. Biological Psychiatry: Cognitive Neuroscience and Neuroimaging. 10.1016/j.bpsc.2017.04.006
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The Nucleus Accumbens and Ketamine Treatment in Major Depressive Disorder

Abstract

Animal models of depression repeatedly showed stress-induced nucleus accumbens (NAc) hypertrophy. Recently, ketamine was found to normalize this stress-induced NAc structural growth. Here, we investigated NAc structural abnormalities in major depressive disorder (MDD) in two cohorts. Cohort A included a cross-sectional sample of 34 MDD and 26 healthy control (HC) subjects, with high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to estimate NAc volumes. Proton MR spectroscopy (1H MRS) was used to divide MDD subjects into two subgroups: glutamate-based depression (GBD) and non-GBD. A separate longitudinal sample (cohort B) included 16 MDD patients who underwent MRI at baseline then 24 h following intravenous infusion of ketamine (0.5 mg/kg). In cohort A, we found larger left NAc volume in MDD compared to controls (Cohen’s d=1.05), but no significant enlargement in the right NAc (d=0.44). Follow-up analyses revealed significant subgrouping effects on the left (d⩾1.48) and right NAc (d⩾0.95) with larger bilateral NAc in non-GBD compared to GBD and HC. NAc volumes were not different between GBD and HC. In cohort B, ketamine treatment reduced left NAc, but increased left hippocampal, volumes in patients achieving remission. The cross-sectional data provided the first evidence of enlarged NAc in patients with MDD. These NAc abnormalities were limited to patients with non-GBD. The pilot longitudinal data revealed a pattern of normalization of left NAc and hippocampal volumes particularly in patients who achieved remission following ketamine treatment, an intriguing preliminary finding that awaits replication.
Abdallah, C. G., Jackowski, A., Salas, R., Gupta, S., Sato, J. R., Mao, X., … & Mathew, S. J. (2017). The nucleus accumbens and ketamine treatment in major depressive disorder. Neuropsychopharmacology1, 8. 10.1038/npp.2017.49
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Ketamine Treatment and Global Brain Connectivity in Major Depression

Abstract

Capitalizing on recent advances in resting state functional connectivity magnetic resonance imaging (rs-fcMRI) and the distinctive paradigm of rapid mood normalization following ketamine treatment, the current study investigated intrinsic brain networks in major depressive disorder (MDD) during a depressive episode and following treatment with ketamine. Medication-free patients with MDD and healthy control subjects (HC) completed baseline rs-fcMRI. MDD patients received a single infusion of ketamine and underwent repeated rs-fcMRI at 24 h post-treatment. Global brain connectivity with global signal regression (GBCr) values were computed as the average of correlations of each voxel with all other gray matter voxels in the brain. MDD group showed reduced GBCr in the prefrontal cortex (PFC), but increased GBCr in the posterior cingulate, precuneus, lingual gyrus, and cerebellum. Ketamine significantly increased GBCr in the PFC and reduced GBCr in the cerebellum. At baseline, 2174 voxels of altered GBCr were identified, but only 310 voxels significantly differed relative to controls following treatment (corrected α<0.05). Responders to ketamine showed increased GBCr in the lateral PFC, caudate, and insula. Followup seed-based analyses illustrated a pattern of dysconnectivity between the PFC/subcortex and the rest of the brain in MDD, which appeared to normalize post-ketamine. The extent of the functional dysconnectivity identified in MDD and the swift and robust normalization following treatment, suggest that GBCr may serve as a treatment response biomarker for the development of rapid acting antidepressants. The data also identified unique prefrontal and striatal circuitry as putative marker of successful treatment and target for antidepressants development.

Abdallah, C. G., Averill, L. A., Collins, K. A., Geha, P., Schwartz, J., Averill, C., … & Iosifescu, D. V. (2016). Ketamine Treatment and Global Brain Connectivity in Major Depression. Neuropsychopharmacology: official publication of the American College of Neuropsychopharmacology. 10.1038/npp.2016.186

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Ketamine as a promising prototype for a new generation of rapid-acting antidepressants

Abstract

The discovery of ketamine’s rapid and robust antidepressant effects opened a window into a new generation of antidepressants. Multiple controlled trials and open-label studies have demonstrated these effects across a variety of patient populations known to often achieve little to no response from traditional antidepressants. Ketamine has been generally well tolerated across patient groups, with transient mild-to-moderate adverse effects during infusion. However, the optimal dosing and route of administration and the safety of chronic treatment are not fully known. This review summarizes the clinical effects of ketamine and its neurobiological underpinnings and mechanisms of action, which may provide insight into the neurobiology of depression, relevant biomarkers, and treatment targets. Moreover, we offer suggestions for future research that may continue to advance the field forward and ultimately improve the psychopharmacologic interventions available for those individuals struggling with depressive and trauma-related disorders.

Abdallah, C. G., Averill, L. A. and Krystal, J. H. (2015), Ketamine as a promising prototype for a new generation of rapid-acting antidepressants. Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences, 1344: 66–77. doi: 10.1111/nyas.12718

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Ketamine and Rapid-Acting Antidepressants: A Window into a New Neurobiology for Mood Disorder Therapeutics

Abstract

Ketamine is the prototype for a new generation of glutamate-based antidepressants that rapidly alleviate depression within hours of treatment. Over the past decade, there has been replicated evidence demonstrating the rapid and potent antidepressant effects of ketamine in treatment-resistant depression. Moreover, preclinical and biomarker studies have begun to elucidate the mechanism underlying the rapid antidepressant effects of ketamine, offering a new window into the biology of depression and identifying a plethora of potential treatment targets. This article discusses the efficacy, safety, and tolerability of ketamine, summarizes the neurobiology of depression, reviews the mechanisms underlying the rapid antidepressant effects of ketamine, and discusses the prospects for next-generation rapid-acting antidepressants.

Abdallah, C. G., Sanacora, G., Duman, R. S., & Krystal, J. H. (2015). Ketamine and Rapid-Acting Antidepressants: A Window into a New Neurobiology for Mood Disorder Therapeutics. Medicine, 66. https://dx.doi.org/10.1146/annurev-med-053013-062946

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27 June - Spiritual & Existential Dimensions in Psychedelic Care: Challenges & Insights

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